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The Man Who Fell to Earth Review: Is Worth Watching or Not?

The Man Who Fell to Earth Review: When a famous film is given the reboot or legacy sequel treatment, I often experience a sense of foreboding. Yes, there have been an unusually high number of disappointments in that particular subject, but it is something that can and has been done properly.

It’s tough to classify Showtime’s The Man Who Fell to Earth as anything other than entertaining. David Bowie starred in the original film as an alien who travels to Earth in order to bring water back to his dying planet.

The Man Who Fell to Earth Review

The film is based on Walter Tevis’s 1963 novel of the same name, which was published in 1963. Unfortunately, he is diverted by all of human civilization’s diversions, and events do not unfold as planned.

The new series serves as a direct sequel to the film, but it has also been updated to reflect the current state of the planet, and it is mostly self-contained. Even before Tevis began writing The Man Who Fell to Earth, the story’s premise had been discussed for some time.

Indeed, with enough time and money, you could certainly trace it all the way back to the very first moment when mankind realised, to our collective astonishment, that the Earth’s resources are not infinite.

Nicolas Roeg’s film “An Inconvenient Truth” was released more than 40 years ago, in 1976, at a time when we were only beginning to realise the extent of the threat posed by global warming.

Importing water from another planet cannot be the answer to our water shortages in 2022. The problem has evolved, and we as a society must adapt, as the core thesis of Showtime’s new series asserts.

The film’s and show’s protagonists are important distinctions between the two productions. Even if it were feasible, recreating Bowie’s renowned performance as Thomas Jerome Newton, the actual man who fell to Earth, would have been futile.

Table of Contents

The Man Who Fell to Earth Review

Newton, played by the legendary Bill Nighy, is a recurring character but not the show’s main character. The new series introduces Faraday, a student of Newton who has come to Earth to help them save their homeworld.

Chiwetel Ejiofor depicts an alien that is unlike any we have seen before. His performance has been nominated for an Academy Award.

Unlike Ejiofor’s erudite Thomas Newton, Faraday is an outcast. The responses of the characters in the movie and the show to Thomas Newton, who appeared to be English, are similar.

Faraday is exposed to every definition of the word “alien,” whether he wants to or not. As a result of his lack of communicative abilities, a third party has assumed Faraday is autistic.

Regardless, the character has a lot of heart and is clearly a wonderful and respectable person. Even in the show’s most humorous moments, Ejiofor’s authenticity keeps the story grounded and grounded, which Justin Falls (Naomie Harris) knows well.

Justin is too busy caring for his elderly father and his little daughter to tolerate Faraday’s antics. Her absence would imperil Faraday’s whole goal.

Anxiety, concern, and fury are eloquently captured by Harris. Harris is a superb actor. Despite her appearance, Justin is one of the world’s most brilliant scientists.

But life has forced her to do odd jobs and deal with shady folks to make ends meet and feed her family.

Justin and Faraday, the series’ two primary characters, are the series’ action axis. Combining the two creates a programme that is both serious and emotionally appealing.

According to The Man Who Fell to Earth, we need evolution, not revolution, to go forward. The series is based on a lecture given by Faraday, presumably after he and Justin had worked out how to save both their and our planets.

And his presentation gives the impression that what happens in the end will be a huge stride forward in our progress as a species. This idea is complimented with stunning images that are both beautiful and weird.

To be honest, this series would be a hit even if it was just a series of similar situations with Ejiofor narrating the story.

Is the show perfect? Maybe not, but the plot’s faults and contradictions are overlooked because it’s so well presented. One thing about Faraday’s worldview isn’t altogether favourable.

It’s contradictory. He arrived on Earth with no prior understanding of human communication and learned what he knows by watching others and mimicking their speaking patterns.

Then we see the guy use scientific phrases he doesn’t comprehend, even if he knows their counterparts in his own language. These instances certainly occur, but they do not always impact the overall viewing experience.

They’re little issues that persist long after the main story has concluded, and we may easily dismiss them. The show’s duration is another flaw.

The Man Who Fell to Earth, directed by Jenny Lumet and written by Alex Kurtzman, is a cinematic follow-up to the 1976 film of the same name. So why do it in 10 episodes?

Even if no movie was planned, a shorter season of the show may have resulted in a more tightly-woven tale. Despite this, the film’s weaknesses are more than made up for by the great performances of the main characters and the aesthetically stunning photography.

Unlike the Bowie film, the Showtime series is a terrific show with something significant to say about modern society. And we’d all benefit from hearing it.

The Man Who Fell To Earth Trailer On Youtube

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The Man Who Fell to Earth Review: Is Worth Watching or Not?

The Man Who Fell to Earth Review: When a famous film is given the reboot or legacy sequel treatment, I often experience a sense of foreboding. Yes, there have been an unusually high number of disappointments in that particular subject, but it is something that can and has been done properly.

It’s tough to classify Showtime’s The Man Who Fell to Earth as anything other than entertaining. David Bowie starred in the original film as an alien who travels to Earth in order to bring water back to his dying planet.

The Man Who Fell to Earth Review

The film is based on Walter Tevis’s 1963 novel of the same name, which was published in 1963. Unfortunately, he is diverted by all of human civilization’s diversions, and events do not unfold as planned.

The new series serves as a direct sequel to the film, but it has also been updated to reflect the current state of the planet, and it is mostly self-contained. Even before Tevis began writing The Man Who Fell to Earth, the story’s premise had been discussed for some time.

Indeed, with enough time and money, you could certainly trace it all the way back to the very first moment when mankind realised, to our collective astonishment, that the Earth’s resources are not infinite.

Nicolas Roeg’s film “An Inconvenient Truth” was released more than 40 years ago, in 1976, at a time when we were only beginning to realise the extent of the threat posed by global warming.

Importing water from another planet cannot be the answer to our water shortages in 2022. The problem has evolved, and we as a society must adapt, as the core thesis of Showtime’s new series asserts.

The film’s and show’s protagonists are important distinctions between the two productions. Even if it were feasible, recreating Bowie’s renowned performance as Thomas Jerome Newton, the actual man who fell to Earth, would have been futile.

Table of Contents

The Man Who Fell to Earth Review

Newton, played by the legendary Bill Nighy, is a recurring character but not the show’s main character. The new series introduces Faraday, a student of Newton who has come to Earth to help them save their homeworld.

Chiwetel Ejiofor depicts an alien that is unlike any we have seen before. His performance has been nominated for an Academy Award.

Unlike Ejiofor’s erudite Thomas Newton, Faraday is an outcast. The responses of the characters in the movie and the show to Thomas Newton, who appeared to be English, are similar.

Faraday is exposed to every definition of the word “alien,” whether he wants to or not. As a result of his lack of communicative abilities, a third party has assumed Faraday is autistic.

Regardless, the character has a lot of heart and is clearly a wonderful and respectable person. Even in the show’s most humorous moments, Ejiofor’s authenticity keeps the story grounded and grounded, which Justin Falls (Naomie Harris) knows well.

Justin is too busy caring for his elderly father and his little daughter to tolerate Faraday’s antics. Her absence would imperil Faraday’s whole goal.

Anxiety, concern, and fury are eloquently captured by Harris. Harris is a superb actor. Despite her appearance, Justin is one of the world’s most brilliant scientists.

But life has forced her to do odd jobs and deal with shady folks to make ends meet and feed her family.

Justin and Faraday, the series’ two primary characters, are the series’ action axis. Combining the two creates a programme that is both serious and emotionally appealing.

According to The Man Who Fell to Earth, we need evolution, not revolution, to go forward. The series is based on a lecture given by Faraday, presumably after he and Justin had worked out how to save both their and our planets.

And his presentation gives the impression that what happens in the end will be a huge stride forward in our progress as a species. This idea is complimented with stunning images that are both beautiful and weird.

To be honest, this series would be a hit even if it was just a series of similar situations with Ejiofor narrating the story.

Is the show perfect? Maybe not, but the plot’s faults and contradictions are overlooked because it’s so well presented. One thing about Faraday’s worldview isn’t altogether favourable.

It’s contradictory. He arrived on Earth with no prior understanding of human communication and learned what he knows by watching others and mimicking their speaking patterns.

Then we see the guy use scientific phrases he doesn’t comprehend, even if he knows their counterparts in his own language. These instances certainly occur, but they do not always impact the overall viewing experience.

They’re little issues that persist long after the main story has concluded, and we may easily dismiss them. The show’s duration is another flaw.

The Man Who Fell to Earth, directed by Jenny Lumet and written by Alex Kurtzman, is a cinematic follow-up to the 1976 film of the same name. So why do it in 10 episodes?

Even if no movie was planned, a shorter season of the show may have resulted in a more tightly-woven tale. Despite this, the film’s weaknesses are more than made up for by the great performances of the main characters and the aesthetically stunning photography.

Unlike the Bowie film, the Showtime series is a terrific show with something significant to say about modern society. And we’d all benefit from hearing it.

The Man Who Fell To Earth Trailer On Youtube

Also Read:

RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Recent Posts