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Rhett And Link Controversy: The reason why Jesus broke up with Rhett and Link

Rhett And Link Controversy: Despite their success, Rhett and Link have sparked debate. Their spiritual change, for example, received criticism from some viewers. Rhett addressed this in a March blog post on Medium. They realized that openly debating something so contentious and provocative would be tough, he wrote. He said that their podcast tales have become more personal as they tackled difficult issues like fatherhood, grief, and self-discovery.

It was becoming rather unbearable (not to mention disingenuous) to keep our Christian faith to ourselves,” Rhett said before going on to explain how leaving the church made him realize how marginalized communities are sometimes neglected or overlooked while they try to make their voices heard.

Rhett and Link’s controversial pick has spawned several Reddit postings. Some fans struggled when they learned of the couple’s change. “It felt like a stab to the gut, and I don’t know why since I am going through my own spiritual pondering,” they said before inviting other viewers to comment.

Table of Contents

Rhett And Link Controversy: Breaking Up with the Bible

The majority of Rhett’s pivotal deconversion milestones correlate with changes in his connection to the Bible and to his own tradition’s understanding of it, as is the case with most former evangelicals (henceforth “ex-vangelicals”).

He begins by recounting how he became a member of a group of Young Earth Creationists in college, who held that the cosmos is just 6,000 to 10,000 years old, or so. Natural selection-based evolution appeared to be a desperate and fruitless attempt to explain how an universe like ours could have come into existence without an intelligent designer, and so he rejected it out of hand.

Also Read: Ooblets Controversy: Epic condemns “spread of fake news and abuse” against Ooblets devs

Bingo! Isn’t it what all of us were looking for, wasn’t it? To become an evangelical Christian, you must read only literature written by other evangelicals in which they explain why they believe what they believe.

Isn’t this true of apologetics in general? It’s not that apologetics books are created for “the lost,” they’re meant for those who have been rescued. As a result, they’ll be gathering dust on the bookshelves of believers who can now rest easier knowing that someone took the effort to write it all down.

Rhett likens the creation of human DNA to an instruction manual that gets two pages stuck together, leaving the headings and footers in place to illustrate exactly where one page finishes and the other begins about 24 minutes into the episode. That’s a great comparison. Humans and other primate descendents carry endogenous retroviruses similar to the coffee stain that comes up in later editions of manuals to demonstrate an earlier common ancestral experience with the initial mutation/stain.

His entire theological system was put to the test by these revelations, but like all of us, he was encouraged to keep asking questions without fear because:

That sounds familiar! I’m sure I mentioned something similar along the way.

Rhett grappled with the historicity of the rest of the Old Testament after abandoning the Young Earth position (the stuff about Jesus would have to wait till later). From Noah’s flood until the Israelites’ conquest of Canaan, history contradicted just much every significant tale, and it didn’t get better for several volumes.

That was one of my toughest pills to take. How much of Israel’s history is made up? Like him, I was convinced archaeology only verifies the Bible, so why not go right in? Like always, we did what we were told. That drove us out in the end.

Also Read: Disney Frozen Controversy: Disney’s new toy has enraged parents since its release

How I Ended My Relationship with Jesus

The idea of entertaining passengers on airlines using talking points from Josh MacDowell and Lee Strobel made me laugh out loud. “Why on planes?” Rhett answered.

Because as an evangelical Christian, sitting next to a stranger may be your only chance to deliver the life-changing gospel of Jesus.

Exvangelicals remember it well. Everyone who knows Jesus has the responsibility of guerilla evangelism, as Lori puts it. If you love him and believe in him, he should be the most essential thing you talk about with everyone.

But now it was Jesus’ time.

Rhett reminds us that you cannot isolate a historical figure from actual history and still claim to be talking about the same person.

My idea of Jesus is founded on both my own experience and what the Bible says about him. This is how we know everything about Jesus.

So history matters. It was time to look beyond the Christian answers and look at the replies to the Christian answers.

Moving to Los Angeles with their families at this time probably helped Rhett and Link work through some of their questions, away from the Christ-Haunted milieu of the Bible Belt. Back in North Carolina, Jessie had attended Bible classes with agnostic biblical scholar Bart Ehrman, and the historical problems those studies highlighted stayed with them.

I won’t go into all his points (if you’re interested), but in the end Rhett decided that “the gospels are a combination of religious propaganda and true history.” He, like me, believes Jesus was a genuine person, even if he didn’t do miracles or rise from the dead.

Rhett uses similar terminology to me while attempting to express what it’s like to look at the world through a different lens to see if anything makes sense. It’s like trying on a new head for a bit. Maybe you’re simply checking to make sure you don’t get struck by lightning.

I’d been yanking on this topic for ages…

Call it the faith sweater…

I had been dragging on this thread till it resembled a vest…

then a midriff…and a halter tap…

currently a string bikini Then I was like [fwip] I’m removing my bikini.

Faith’s sweater Great. I particularly appreciate him stating that unpleasant events did not cause him to lose faith. In fact, he said, being a straight white guy in an evangelical church helped him.

No one I knew personally…

pastors, Christian friends, church elders…none of them let me down. I had no personal tragedy…but I hated the philosophers. I was enraged with the authors.

I guess I still have some sympathy for those tasked with making sense of it all for the church. But I also know from experience that defending the faith needs a lot of squinting and shutting one eye to make sure everything looks right.

Then there are others who follow their consciences out of the fold and are accused of every filthy reason conceivable.

Also Read: Big Shot Season 2 Release Date: Confirmation on Renewal or Cancellation!

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Rhett And Link Controversy: The reason why Jesus broke up with Rhett and Link

Rhett And Link Controversy: Despite their success, Rhett and Link have sparked debate. Their spiritual change, for example, received criticism from some viewers. Rhett addressed this in a March blog post on Medium. They realized that openly debating something so contentious and provocative would be tough, he wrote. He said that their podcast tales have become more personal as they tackled difficult issues like fatherhood, grief, and self-discovery.

It was becoming rather unbearable (not to mention disingenuous) to keep our Christian faith to ourselves,” Rhett said before going on to explain how leaving the church made him realize how marginalized communities are sometimes neglected or overlooked while they try to make their voices heard.

Rhett and Link’s controversial pick has spawned several Reddit postings. Some fans struggled when they learned of the couple’s change. “It felt like a stab to the gut, and I don’t know why since I am going through my own spiritual pondering,” they said before inviting other viewers to comment.

Table of Contents

Rhett And Link Controversy: Breaking Up with the Bible

The majority of Rhett’s pivotal deconversion milestones correlate with changes in his connection to the Bible and to his own tradition’s understanding of it, as is the case with most former evangelicals (henceforth “ex-vangelicals”).

He begins by recounting how he became a member of a group of Young Earth Creationists in college, who held that the cosmos is just 6,000 to 10,000 years old, or so. Natural selection-based evolution appeared to be a desperate and fruitless attempt to explain how an universe like ours could have come into existence without an intelligent designer, and so he rejected it out of hand.

Also Read: Ooblets Controversy: Epic condemns “spread of fake news and abuse” against Ooblets devs

Bingo! Isn’t it what all of us were looking for, wasn’t it? To become an evangelical Christian, you must read only literature written by other evangelicals in which they explain why they believe what they believe.

Isn’t this true of apologetics in general? It’s not that apologetics books are created for “the lost,” they’re meant for those who have been rescued. As a result, they’ll be gathering dust on the bookshelves of believers who can now rest easier knowing that someone took the effort to write it all down.

Rhett likens the creation of human DNA to an instruction manual that gets two pages stuck together, leaving the headings and footers in place to illustrate exactly where one page finishes and the other begins about 24 minutes into the episode. That’s a great comparison. Humans and other primate descendents carry endogenous retroviruses similar to the coffee stain that comes up in later editions of manuals to demonstrate an earlier common ancestral experience with the initial mutation/stain.

His entire theological system was put to the test by these revelations, but like all of us, he was encouraged to keep asking questions without fear because:

That sounds familiar! I’m sure I mentioned something similar along the way.

Rhett grappled with the historicity of the rest of the Old Testament after abandoning the Young Earth position (the stuff about Jesus would have to wait till later). From Noah’s flood until the Israelites’ conquest of Canaan, history contradicted just much every significant tale, and it didn’t get better for several volumes.

That was one of my toughest pills to take. How much of Israel’s history is made up? Like him, I was convinced archaeology only verifies the Bible, so why not go right in? Like always, we did what we were told. That drove us out in the end.

Also Read: Disney Frozen Controversy: Disney’s new toy has enraged parents since its release

How I Ended My Relationship with Jesus

The idea of entertaining passengers on airlines using talking points from Josh MacDowell and Lee Strobel made me laugh out loud. “Why on planes?” Rhett answered.

Because as an evangelical Christian, sitting next to a stranger may be your only chance to deliver the life-changing gospel of Jesus.

Exvangelicals remember it well. Everyone who knows Jesus has the responsibility of guerilla evangelism, as Lori puts it. If you love him and believe in him, he should be the most essential thing you talk about with everyone.

But now it was Jesus’ time.

Rhett reminds us that you cannot isolate a historical figure from actual history and still claim to be talking about the same person.

My idea of Jesus is founded on both my own experience and what the Bible says about him. This is how we know everything about Jesus.

So history matters. It was time to look beyond the Christian answers and look at the replies to the Christian answers.

Moving to Los Angeles with their families at this time probably helped Rhett and Link work through some of their questions, away from the Christ-Haunted milieu of the Bible Belt. Back in North Carolina, Jessie had attended Bible classes with agnostic biblical scholar Bart Ehrman, and the historical problems those studies highlighted stayed with them.

I won’t go into all his points (if you’re interested), but in the end Rhett decided that “the gospels are a combination of religious propaganda and true history.” He, like me, believes Jesus was a genuine person, even if he didn’t do miracles or rise from the dead.

Rhett uses similar terminology to me while attempting to express what it’s like to look at the world through a different lens to see if anything makes sense. It’s like trying on a new head for a bit. Maybe you’re simply checking to make sure you don’t get struck by lightning.

I’d been yanking on this topic for ages…

Call it the faith sweater…

I had been dragging on this thread till it resembled a vest…

then a midriff…and a halter tap…

currently a string bikini Then I was like [fwip] I’m removing my bikini.

Faith’s sweater Great. I particularly appreciate him stating that unpleasant events did not cause him to lose faith. In fact, he said, being a straight white guy in an evangelical church helped him.

No one I knew personally…

pastors, Christian friends, church elders…none of them let me down. I had no personal tragedy…but I hated the philosophers. I was enraged with the authors.

I guess I still have some sympathy for those tasked with making sense of it all for the church. But I also know from experience that defending the faith needs a lot of squinting and shutting one eye to make sure everything looks right.

Then there are others who follow their consciences out of the fold and are accused of every filthy reason conceivable.

Also Read: Big Shot Season 2 Release Date: Confirmation on Renewal or Cancellation!

RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

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